ABOUT

Avid outdoorsman and underwater photographer, Barry Brown has spent the last 12 years documenting life above and below water in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. He is currently working with the Smithsonian Institution documenting new Caribbean deep-water species and building a one of a kind database. His underwater images can regularly be seen in Sport Diver, Scuba Diver and on the Ikelite website. His image of a "Collage of Corals" seen under blue-light at night recently placed in the TOP 10 images for the 2014 NANPA (North American Nature Photographers Association) photo contest.

General

Archive for September, 2016

Sep 30, 16     Comments Off on Endangered Corals, Elkhorn Coral Polyps Macro
Sep 28, 16     Comments Off on Saint Joris Bay Clean-up with “The Dive Bus”
Sep 26, 16     Comments Off on Underwater Blue-Light Photos, Giant Star Corals
Sep 23, 16     Comments Off on Siderastrea siderea, Starlet Corals Spawning
Sep 20, 16     Comments Off on Message in a Bottle Floating in the Carribean Sea
Sep 19, 16     Comments Off on Coastal Clean-Up Day September 16th, 17th & 18th
Sep 13, 16     Comments Off on CIEE Bonaire, Scientific Programs for School Kids

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Good afternoon all, we just finished with the kids from the CIEE Research Station in Bonaire, we had 12 kids total meaning we did two submersible runs yesterday and one this morning. For years you have heard me me say “we have the kids from Bonaire coming today” well finally I have time to throw a short post out there for you all. So what does CIEE mean?? I actually had to look it up as my guess didn’t even come close.. It means “Council on International Educational Exchange” and folks this is a big organization, here is the link…  www.ciee.org 

CIEE is a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization, CIEE is the country’s oldest and largest nonprofit study abroad and intercultural exchange organization. Since 1947, CIEE has helped thousands of people gain the knowledge and skills necessary to live and work in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world by offering the most comprehensive, relevant, and valuable exchange programs available. They began nearly 70 years ago with a mission to help people gain understanding, acquire knowledge, and develop skills for living in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world. It’s an undertaking they have been proud to pursue for seven decades. Today, they serve more than 340 U.S. colleges and universities, 1,000 U.S. high schools, and 35,000-plus international exchange students each year and claim “We change lives; our alumni change the world”.

The CIEE mission is to provide outstanding educational opportunities to students in Tropical Marine Ecology and Conservation. We strive to provide interdisciplinary marine research opportunities for CIEE students as well as visiting scientists and their students from around the world. Collaboration with ongoing local research and conservation efforts is basic to our mission as is our commitment to provide scientific data, analysis and support to Bonaire’s environmental, educational and governmental entities.

The two girls above, Haley and Danielle were part of the 12 LUCKY kids that got to jump in our 2.5 million dollar submersible this week and take a ride deep into the deep Curacao abyss. I personally love having these kids visit and enjoy photographing them in the sub, they always bring a much needed breath of fresh air into our lives and end up re-charging our whole group with their fun, positive energy! Keep in mind, these are the kids that we hope will be able to fix, repair or heal the oceans with new ideas and ways to save our fragile liquid environment, we are all counting on them…

Have a great day, check out their website.

Barry

Sep 8, 16     Comments Off on Baby/Juvenile Flying Gurnard, Colorful Reef Fish
Sep 6, 16     Comments Off on Sea-Glass, Beach Glass, Caribbean Sea Glass

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Good morning friends, I have a Caribbean sea-glass photo for you all today that we shot in Bonaire last week on our two day mini-vacation. Sea glass is a unique thing, it first went from being discarded trash thrown into the sea or on the beach and then “presto” many, many years later it’s now a collected treasure, I wish all trash could be reused like this. If your in Bonaire and looking for sea-glass check out the beaches on Klein Bonaire, you will have to take a water taxi to get there and keep in mind its HOT so take plenty to drink. Klein Bonaire also has very little to no shade so take hats and sunscreen, if you wanting to walk around the whole island that will take around two hours. 

Not a lot going on these days, we kind of lost our winds and it’s trying to rain, very strange time of year. They are still predicting warmer seas for this area some time this month which could cause coral bleaching, I am watching…

I hope you all are well out there, keep in touch.

Barry

 

 

Sep 5, 16     Comments Off on Donkey Sanctuary Bonaire, Animal Rescue Bonaire

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Good morning all, as most of you know Aimee and I took off to Bonaire last week for the worlds fasted mini-vacation/business trip which mainly involved me taking photos on the beach all day. We were only there for two days and on the last day we passed by the Bonaire Donkey Sanctuary and of course we had to stop! For most people when you say Bonaire they think of trouble free diving, kite surfing or flamingos but for the most part are unaware of the donkey sanctuary. 

As the story goes, In 1993 Marina Melis (top photo) and her husband Ed Koopman, both from Holland established a donkey sanctuary on Bonaire for sick, wounded and orphaned donkeys. This wonderful sanctuary not only provides help to donkeys in distress, but strives to offer a protected life to all the donkeys on Bonaire. They also distribute information among the local community, schools and tourists, helping to raise awareness and understanding. Hundreds (600 to date) have found shelter here, they are provided food and water and medical care if needed. The sanctuary is located on route to Lac Bay and opens at 10:00 every day seven days a week. Donkeys have been living on this tropical island for hundreds of years originally brought over by Spanish to use for hard labor. 

Finding a long-term solution for the feral donkeys on Bonaire, and in other places with similar challenges, is complex. For the past 21 years, the Donkey Sanctuary Bonaire has been responding to nearly all donkey emergencies on the island and taking care of its sick, injured and orphaned donkeys. However, a sanctuary is only one aspect of feral donkey management. Part of The Donkey Sanctuary’s new strategy is to learn from good practice in the management of feral donkey populations and it is by helping to share this information, along with open discussions with residents, locals vets and representatives of the Bonaire Government, that the long-term welfare of Bonaire’s donkeys will be safeguarded.

Aimee and I had a total blast here as you can see from the above photos starting with a visit to see a new born (photo #2) that was so cute and playful. Aimee instantly fell in love with this little one and asked me countless times if we could take a donkey home?? We had a great intern from Holland that gave us the grand tour showing us not only the new born but also some of the sad cases like photo #3 showing what happens when a donkey and a speeding car collide… Photo #4 shows the name collars for the original donkeys many years ago, Aimee’s name is one of them, I didn’t see mine. The remaining photos I shot during our one hour drive around the 165 acre loop, it was super fun. Aimee bought carrots and fed them to all who came to our window “which was a lot”, we needed more carrots! You can also buy a bale of hale and sit on your tailgate and feed and drive, it’s a great way to get closer to them. During the driving tour you can stop anywhere and go hiking, the donkeys will follow you and almost all of them let us pet them, such fun creatures! Before we left we stopped into the gift shop and filled out papers to “adopt a donkey”, it sure goes to a great cause…

Here’s the link, check out the adoption page.

www.donkeysanctuary.org 

Have a wonderful day..

Barry

Sep 2, 16     Comments Off on Pokemon Sign in CURACAO, Don’t Pokemon!!

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Good morning friends, we are back from our three day mini-vacation to Bonaire, it was fun while it lasted! On our way to the airport in Curacao last tuesday we passed this “DON’T POKEMON and DRIVE” sign and I had to stop to take a photo! I’m pretty much lost for words on this, have we taken a giant leap backwards in human evolution?? I thought Pokemon was a child’s game and now we are telling grown adults to not Pokemon and drive?? Someone out there please help me with this one….

Our Bonaire trip was filled with ups and downs starting with Insel Air being our first down. We got to the airport two hours early and just before boarding for our 15 minute flight to Bonaire they changed our departure time to another two hours, so we sat there for over four hours, I guess we should have just gone with Divi-Divi or rented a kayak? We stayed at Ocean Breeze apartments right across from the airport and it was great, it had all the comforts of home and more. We spent most of wednesday photographing sea-glass on the beach at our favorite dive site called Invisibles, it was such a beautiful place to hang out. On thursday we finished up on photos at the same place and then spent the rest of the afternoon at the Bonaire Donkey Sanctuary, I will post photos and a story tomorrow of that adventure. Our trip went fast, we found out Bonaire has become very expensive to do anything except for the Donkey place that was only $7, next time we will eat all our meals at home.

Hope all is well out there, tons to do!!

Have a great weekend.

Barry

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