ABOUT

Avid outdoorsman and underwater photographer, Barry Brown has spent the last 12 years documenting life above and below water in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. He is currently working with the Smithsonian Institution documenting new Caribbean deep-water species and building a one of a kind database. His underwater images can regularly be seen in Sport Diver, Scuba Diver and on the Ikelite website. His image of a "Collage of Corals" seen under blue-light at night recently placed in the TOP 10 images for the 2014 NANPA (North American Nature Photographers Association) photo contest.

General

Nov 24, 16     Comments Off on Christmas Tree Worm, Night Diving, Macro Image

x-mas-tree-worm

Good morning friends, sorry about the lack of blogs as of late but I am way too busy these days to post. My last day of work was on the 11th and we leave Curacao on the 16th on December so as you can image we are busy! I have a long list of last minute photos that I am trying to get done but it seems like I have taken on more than I can chew. The rainy season has finally hit and this alone is making it very hard to get my topside shots finished because of the lack of sun these past few days but I am trying. I have been doing a lot of cycling getting ready for the 80k Curacao Extreme race which happens on the 4th of next month “weather permitting”. I’ve been taking my bike and camera gear into Punda these past days shooting as much architecture as possible to use for Curacao slide-shows back in the States, this has been a fun project but super exhausting. Getting around on the bike is so easy compared to walking or driving, I can photograph so much more in a short amount of time. I am also doing a ton of diving as many of you have seen on my Twitter account, if your interested just go to Twitter and put SquidLover3 in the search box. The dogs are fine, Inca has good days and bad, her hip is really starting to bother her but all in all she is doing well.

I have a super beautiful Christmas tree worm for your Thanksgiving viewing pleasure today that I shot on last nights super fun night dive.

Spirobranchus giganteus, commonly known as Christmas tree worms, are tube-building polychaete worms belonging to the family Serpulidae.worm is aptly named, both its common and Latin names refer to the two chromatically hued spiral structures, the most common feature seen by divers. The multicolored spirals are highly derived structures for feeding and respiration.

Spirobranchus Gianteius Peniez is similar to most tube-building polychaetes. It has a tubular, segmented body lined with chaeta, small appendages that aid the worm’s mobility. Because it does not move outside its tube, this worm does not have any specialized appendages for movement or swimming.

The worms’ most distinct features are two “crowns” shaped like Christmas trees. These are highly modified prostomial palps, which are specialized mouth appendages. Each spiral is composed of feather-like tentacles called radioles, which are heavily ciliated and cause any prey trapped in them to be transported to the worm’s mouth. While they are primarily feeding structures, S. giganteus also uses its radioles for respiration; hence, the structures commonly are called “gills.”

One major difference between Christmas tree worms and the closely related sabellida fan worms is that the latter do not have any specialized body structures to plug their tube holes when they withdraw into them. S. giganteus, like other members of its family, possess a modified radiole, usually called the operculum, that it uses to secure its hole when withdrawn into its tube.

As an annelid, S. giganteus possesses a complete digestive system and has a well-developed closed circulatory system. Like other annelids, these worms possess well-developed nervous systems with a central brain and many supporting ganglia, including pedal ganglia, unique to the Polychaeta. Like other polychaetes, S. giganteus excrete with fully developed nephridia. When they reproduce, they simply shed their gametes straight into the water where the eggs (and spermatozoa) become part of the zooplankton to be carried by the currents.

Have a great holiday!!

Barry

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