ABOUT

Avid outdoorsman and underwater photographer, Barry Brown has spent the last 12 years documenting life above and below water in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. He is currently working with the Smithsonian Institution documenting new Caribbean deep-water species and building a one of a kind database. His underwater images can regularly be seen in Sport Diver, Scuba Diver and on the Ikelite website. His image of a "Collage of Corals" seen under blue-light at night recently placed in the TOP 10 images for the 2014 NANPA (North American Nature Photographers Association) photo contest.

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Jan 26, 17     Comments Off on Decodon, Deep Sea Fish, Rare Fish, Deep Wrasses

Good morning Amigo’s, I have another Insane colored deep-sea fish for you all today that was found in Bonaire hundreds of feet below the surface by the folks from the Smithsonian Institution using a mini-submersible owned by Substation Curacao. This is a Decodon sp. which is a genus of wrasses found in the western Atlantic, the western Indian and the Pacific Oceans. Because of the rareness of this fish there is very little know about it, in fact you may be looking at a brand new species never before seen by man. The Smithsonian will now do DNA testing to see if this and others are either a known species or if they have something new, stay tuned for that answer…

Wrasses have protractile mouths, usually with separate jaw teeth that jut outwards. Many species can be readily recognized by their thick lips, the inside of which is sometimes curiously folded, a peculiarity which gave rise the German name of “lip-fishes” (Lippfische.) and the Dutch name of “lipvissen”. The dorsal fin has eight to 21 spines and six to 21 soft rays, usually running most of the length of the back. Wrasse are sexually dimorphic. Many species are capable of changing sex. Juveniles are a mix of males and females (known as initial phase individuals), but the largest adults become territory-holding (terminal phase) males.

The wrasses have become a primary study species in fish-feeding biomechanics due to their jaw structures. The nasal and mandibular bones are connected at their posterior ends to the rigid neurocranium, and the superior and inferior articulations of the maxilla are joined to the anterior tips of these two bones, respectively, creating a loop of four rigid bones connected by moving joints. This “four-bar linkage” has the property of allowing numerous arrangements to achieve a given mechanical result (fast jaw protrusion or a forceful bite), thus decoupling morphology from function. The actual morphology of wrasses reflects this, with many lineages displaying different jaw morphology that results in the same functional output in a similar or identical ecological niche.

Have a wonderful day, it’s almost Friday!!

Barry

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