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Avid outdoorsman and underwater photographer, Barry Brown has spent the last 12 years documenting life above and below water in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. He is currently working with the Smithsonian Institution documenting new Caribbean deep-water species and building a one of a kind database. His underwater images can regularly be seen in Sport Diver, Scuba Diver and on the Ikelite website. His image of a "Collage of Corals" seen under blue-light at night recently placed in the TOP 10 images for the 2014 NANPA (North American Nature Photographers Association) photo contest.

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Jan 2, 17     Comments Off on Happy New Year, Secretary Blenny, Cute Reef Fish

Happy New Year out there!! I’m super busy these days getting ready for a trip to Bonaire on the 14th, I will be there for a week aboard the Chapman shooting photos for the World famous Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The plan is, the scientists go down in a mini-sub for 3-6 hours at a time and I wait on the ship, cameras loaded and tanks ready to photograph whatever they may find. The Smithsonian is very selective about what they collect, they don’t haul up everything they see and have a shopping list of sorts of what they hope to find or that they are looking for. I have two cold water tanks waiting on the ship with the camera sitting on a giant tripod, I will try to recreate the scenes from below making the photos look like they were taken in the deep. Keep checking in, I’m not sure what kind on internet connections we will have in Bonaire on the ship but I will try to keep in touch, especially for my friends on Twitter.

The Secretary Blenny (Acanthemblemaria maria) is a small, tube-dwelling blenny (suborder Blennioidei) that is identified by its brownish to green delicate patterns and free moving eyes. Averaging at a size of around one inch in length, Secretary Blennies are difficult to spot when hidden in their burrowed homes.

Although a variety of blenny species are commonly found in shallow reefs around the globe, Secretary Blennies are mostly distributed throughout the Bahamas and other regions of the Eastern Caribbean. These blennies are most often found resting inside their tubed dwelling, usually burrowed into pieces of dead coral or reef, with their tiny heads bobbing in and out of the hole and can be found at a depth of 5-25 feet.

While the Secretary Blenny is most comfortable in the protection of its home, these fish are often seen poking their heads out of the hole –a head approx. the size of a pea- and will rarely venture far unless jumping out for a bite to eat. This species is most recognizable by its sharp skeleton-shaped jaw and eyes that can move independently from each other.

Great info from our friends at www.divephotoguide.com

Have a wonderful day out there….

Barry

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